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Jared Kushner Pursues Immigration Reform

Jared Kushner Pursues Immigration Reform

Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner is working on a proposal to expand legal immigration opportunities for low- and high-skilled workers.

Kushner in January began hosting meetings with business and immigration advocacy groups and has continued negotiations with a four-person team at the White House.

His efforts to reform legal immigration, assigned to him by the president, are in part a response to business groups who have asked the government to add permanent slots for immigrants amid a downturn in unemployment.

The final proposal, expected sometime this summer, will likely include cuts to some forms of legal immigration so as not to produce a net increase in legal arrivals.

“I need people coming in because we need people to run the factories and plants and companies that are moving back in,” said President Trump. “We need people.”

As it stands, roughly 140,000 of the 1 million+ immigrants allowed into the country each year arrive with job prospects. The rest are are relatives, refugees, or arrivals from countries with low rates of immigration to the US.

To compare, roughly 100,000 illegals were apprehended at the southern border during the month of March. An estimated 12 million illegal immigrants currently live in the US.

In the meantime, critics worry that Kushner’s moderate views will persuade Trump to abandon his promises on immigration policy.

“The president must remember that he was elected to implement an immigration system that serves national interests, not business interests,” explains RJ Hauman, an advocate for reduced migration. “A plan to increase overall immigration is nothing more than a handout to businesses so they don’t have to compete for American workers and raise wages.”

“[The Administration] should be 100 percent on fixing the border crisis and not on other parts of the immigration system,” adds Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies.

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7 Comments

  1. madmemere

    As I recall, we still have something in the vicinity of 50 MILLION “working age Americans” – -who are STILL unemployed! Let’s get them back to work FIRST and THEN worry about allowing immigrant “workers” into to this country.

    Reply
  2. JEAN f CRAIG

    I READS TODAY THAT A LOT OF WHITE MEN ARE ON WELFARE BECAUSE THEY DO NOT HAVE A JOB. PUT THEM TO WORK AND STOP WELFARE. STOP ALL WELFARE TO ILLEGALS THEY WILL STAY HOME

    Reply
  3. marlene

    The final proposal, expected sometime this summer, will likely include cuts to some forms of legal immigration so as not to produce a net increase in legal arrivals.

    “I need people coming in because we need people to run the factories and plants and companies that are moving back in,” said President Trump. “We need people.”

    As it stands, roughly 140,000 of the 1 million+ immigrants allowed into the country each year arrive with job prospects. The rest are are relatives, refugees, or arrivals from countries with low rates of immigration to the US.

    To compare, roughly 100,000 illegals were apprehended at the southern border during the month of March. An estimated 12 million illegal immigrants currently live in the US.

    In the meantime, critics worry that Kushner’s moderate views will persuade Trump to abandon his promises on immigration policy.

    “The president must remember that he was elected to implement an immigration system that serves national interests, not business interests,” explains RJ Hauman, an advocate for reduced migration. “A plan to increase overall immigration is nothing more than a handout to businesses so they don’t have to compete for American workers and raise wages.”

    “[The Administration] should be 100 percent on fixing the border crisis and not on other parts of the immigration system,” adds Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Reply
    • marlene

      This is NOT the comment I made. How did this get here? This is also not the first time that my comment turned out to be entirely different from the one I posted. What’s up with this???

      Reply
      • Joe Gilbertson

        Stop with marijuana, you are getting paranoid…

        Reply
  4. marlene

    Hey, we voted for Donald Trump, not this little sh*head! These nobodys have no say in immigration policy, or on any other policy. We voted for the man who represents our wishes to MAGA, not for the sideliner who puts Americans last. Jared’s facial expression resembles a hitler nazi official. Can you see it? I do.

    Reply
  5. marlene

    I’m more than concerned that Trump would select a leftist as his adviser. Disappointment is beginning to set in and my suspicions are becoming aroused… Every announcement of a step forward on limiting immigration is always followed by something just the opposite. Has anyone else noticed this?

    Reply

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