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Racism in America: Fact and Fiction

Racism in America: Fact and Fiction

In view of the race motivated killing in Jacksonville, Florida, it may be a good time to examine the sources, the existence and the realities of such irrational hatred. In order to do that, we need to set aside emotional rhetoric and political narratives to gain an objective understanding of the current reality – and how we got here.  Are we inherently a racist people, or not?  Can racism exist in a nation in which the people – as a whole — are not racist?  What are the dimensions and manifestations of racism in America?

Social conflicts between people who are perceived to be different have been a part of human history since the earliest times – whether based on race, ethnicity, religion, lifestyles, or tribal distinctions.  At the foundation of the conflicts have been power, territory, resources (wealth) and a sense of cultural threat.

For thousands of years, institutional slavery was prevalent in every culture throughout the world.  Though present in past ages, Negro slavery was not the most common form.  Conquered armies and peoples were a common source of slave labor.  Virtually every great ancient empire incorporated slavery as a workforce component.

As world civilization became more enlightened, slavery diminished.  There arose increasingly powerful anti-slavery movements – and institutional slavery began to ebb.

While most Americans may know that Native Americans were also enslaved by colonialists, they may not know that Native Americans engaged in inter-tribal slavery before and during European occupation.  In fact, slavery by Native Americans did not end until 1866 when the United States government and five major tribes signed a treaty.

On of the significant distinctions between Negro slavery and other forms is that the latter did not question the very humanity of the slaves. Greek, Roman, Egyptian slaves were not considered to be a lesser form of human being – an inferior subculture, a different species.

That distinction explains why Negroes remained segregated and oppressed even after the abolition of slavery – rather than assimilating into the population as have all other foreign groups coming to America. That explains the laws against intermarriage, dating and co-habitation.

White supremacy over the Negro population was most virulent in the states of the old confederacy where the confederate element of the Democratic Party reigned supreme.  That led to more than 100 years of de jure illegal and unconstitutional institutional racism.  It was the era of Jim Crow, lynchings, cross burnings and Ku Klux Klan (and other paramilitary group) terrorism.

Government sponsored or condoned de facto institutional racism took hold in the major northern cities as the Great Migration of former slaves moved north and west.  This led to the urban segregation and oppression we see the remnants of today in the longstanding Democratic Party strongholds.

The first half of the Twentieth Century were marked by monstrous and deadly racism in the south and in the northern major cities with large black segregated populations.  The belief in Negro inferiority – or white supremacy — were a mainstay in the administration of the two most racist presidents of the Twentieth Century – Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt.

De jure Jim Crow institutional racism in the South officially came to an end in the mid-1900s when the Republican sponsored and supported civil rights legislation of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 was successfully passed over the opposition and filibusters of the powerful Southern Democrats

In a previous commentary, I argued – with ample evidence – that the contemporary American people are not racially prejudiced.  Legislation and education – enlightenment – has had a major impact on the American culture.  In fact, we are among the least racist nations on earth.  We are an immigrant-friendly nation (legal, of course).

As I wrote in my previous commentary:

“We should keep in mind that billions of times every day … yes, billions … black and white Americans smile and nod to each other as we pass on the streets.  We serve each other in restaurants and stores.  We work side-by-side in factories and offices.  We do favors for each other.  We come to each other’s aid. We cheer alongside each other on both sides of every sports arena.  We play on the same teams.  We chat on social media.  We die alongside each other in battle.   We become lifelong friends. We adopt each other.  We fall in love and marry each other. We laugh together at the same movies, and we weep together at shared tragedies.”

That is the American reality at the grassroots.  It does not mean that the last vestige of racism and racial oppression of black America has been totally eliminated.  However, it is not the product of the American people per se – who live, work, play and love together harmoniously on a day-to-day basis.

But there are two significant remnants of racism remaining.  The Jacksonville shooting represents one of them – individuals who are obsessed or deranged by racial hatred.  They represent a miniscule portion of the population but those who act on their impulses become the story of the day.  For the most part, they are lone wolves – much like other mass shooters who have different motivations or no discernible motivation at all.

White supremacists do congregate in clubs and organizations – or on social media platforms — to spew their hateful opinions. But even very few of them are motivated to carry out violent actions.  On the other hand, it is fair to argue that their rhetoric fuels the lone wolf who does take deadly action.

If there is any good news regarding the white supremacist movement, it is the fact that it is far smaller and far less involved in group violence than its predecessors.  The hundreds – or even thousands — of members of white supremacist groups today pales in comparison to the tens and hundreds of thousands of members of the old Ku Klux Klan, the Red Shirts, the knights of the White Camelia, and the White Citizens Councils.

It is important to note that white supremacists today do not have the endorsement or support of the governing establishment as was the case in the past – in both the south and the major cities.  Today, white supremacists are the pariah of society.  They have virtually no influence on government leaders and public policy.

But … the racist clubs and individuals are a malignant force.  Their periodic violent actions need to be addressed in terms of law enforcement and prevention.  In addressing the white supremacists, we need to use education to prevent young people from taking up racist ideology.  When they do, we need to identify them and take action, where appropriate.  We need to deal more effectively with those who have manifest mental health issues.  When there is a violent event, we need to put the full force of the law behind holding them accountable.  We need to enforce the current laws that are designed to keep guns out of the hands of potential killers.

That is how we put racial hatred in remission —  but there is still more to do.  It is an evolutionary process.

The other remnant of racism in America is the de facto institutional racism we still find in our major cities.  In terms of oppression and lives lost, urban institutional racism is far more dangerous, damaging and deadly to the black community and society in general than the violent actions of a lone wolf – as terrible as each instance may be.

Urban de facto institutional racism is the reason that millions of black folks are trapped in impoverished and violent segregated communities – with depression level unemployment, poor quality education, substandard housing, crumbling infrastructure, unequal justice, racist policing, unequal justice, high crime and THOUSANDS of murdered black people every year – too often innocent children.

Ironically, the tragic oppression of ghetto-ized blacks is shifting from outright racial animosity to the maintenance of a system that provides maximum power, prestige and profits for those in the city halls and their cronies.  That is why the racially oppressive systems and the conditions remain even when the segregated communities are represented by a black ward official, a black alderman, a black mayor, a black state representative, a black state senator, a black congressman, in some cases a black United States Senator and for eight years a black President.

The systems and conditions of black oppression remain unchanged generation-after-generation even as trillions of dollars flow from Washington and state governments to address the plight of the folks in the ‘hood.  There is no change because much of that money flows to the political and civic establishment and its allies, supporters, cronies and families.

It is fair and necessary to point out that the generational segregation and oppression of black Americans is almost exclusively in those large cities – with large black populations – that have been ruled over by long-established one-party Democrat political machines – and the de facto racist policies they impose.

These urban political machines are the equivalent of the old Jim Crow-era racist Democrat power bloc in Congress.  National Democrats refuse to address the racism within their own ranks.  They not only pretend that the de facto institutional racism does not exist but claim that the very folks in the city halls who are oppressing their black citizens are actually benefactors.

Institutional racism will endure until we do one of two things.  Change the policies or change the leaders.

Racism in America – de jure and de facto — has been declining over the years.  Even the remnants we see today do not have the power and influence of years gone by.  But like cancer, we need to eradicate it completely to prevent recurrence.

So, there ‘tis.

About The Author

Larry Horist

So,there‘tis… The opinions, perspectives and analyses of Larry Horist Larry Horist is a businessman, conservative writer and political strategist with an extensive background in economics and public policy. Clients of his consulting firm have included such conservative icons as Steve Forbes and Milton Friedman. He has served as a consultant to the Nixon White House and travelled the country as a spokesman for President Reagan’s economic reforms. He has testified as an expert witness before numerous legislative bodies, including the U. S. Congress. Horist has lectured and taught courses at numerous colleges and universities, including Harvard, Northwestern, DePaul universities, Hope College and his alma mater, Knox College. He has been a guest on hundreds of public affairs talk shows, and hosted his own program, “Chicago In Sight,” on WIND radio. Horist was a one-time candidate for mayor of Chicago and served as Executive Director of the City Club of Chicago, where he led a successful two-year campaign to save the historic Chicago Theatre from the wrecking ball. An award-winning debater, his insightful and sometimes controversial commentaries appear frequently on the editorial pages of newspapers across the nation. He is praised by readers for his style, substance and sense of humor. According to one reader, Horist is the “new Charles Krauthammer.” He is actively semi-retired in Boca Raton, Florida where he devotes his time to writing. So, there ‘tis is Horist’s signature sign off.

24 Comments

  1. Mack ewing

    Racism exist because of race baiters and people like Al sharpton claiming that there’s a klansman behind every bush. And when BLM were allowed to riot and burn down buildings and hurt people without much consequences that also fans the flames. Yes, there’s evil people such as the bastard who shot the people in Florida. But he’s burning in hell and I hope satan shoves a pitchfork up his ass. On the other hand blacks have harmed white people just because they were white. When does it end? When reparations are paid? How about reparations for whites too?

    • larry Horist

      I agree. The left does not recognized black racism Most blacks are not racists, just as whites are not. But black racism does exist. There is a huge difference between Sharpton/Jackson and Martin Luther King.

  2. Dan tyree

    Pay the democrats first. They haven’t been the same since the republicans took their slaves away.

    • larry Horist

      Dan tyree … Now you are going to get Frank Stetson all upset.

      • Theodore

        Haha! Boy have you got that right. I was pleasantly surprised not to find any of his drivel at the end of your post. He would have claimed that everything you said was wrong and that only he knows the truth as he is the omnipotent purveyor of all knowledge, or so he seems to often claim. I can barely read more than two or three sentences of his without laughing my ass off or feeling a little sick. It’s a beautiful day when he doesn’t post.

        • Theodore

          So much for the beautiful day, the dark cloud appeared while I was making my post. As usual, there are a lot of words that probably don’t actually say anything of importance except to him. I’m not going to waste my time or the rest of this ay reading them.

  3. frank stetson

    Horist claims he’s not obsessed with me, nbl. Supposedly he’s working on a book with similar themes; I guess we are the beta test. The key here that Horist targets are the twins of Dixiecrats and Democrats, evil twins, but Horist misses “not of the same mother.”

    One point Horist does not make is about the American indentured servant class. These folks, mostly white, began coming to America around 1620 in a system created by the Virginia Company of Jamestown fame. Signed up for 4-7 years for passage, room and board, it was not slavery, but could often be mistaken for it. Life was restrictive and punishments could be very harsh. Blacks coming at this time were treated as servants too until the mid 1600’s when slave laws were passed, and not by Democrats, but by Americans. Up until the revolution, 50 – 66% of folks coming to America were servant class. I believe one or two are in my wife’s heritage. It lasted to about 1800 when the North stopped and the South went full slave economy. The slave economy added a one-time payment for life versus 7 years, and the ability to breed to create a larger, growing asset.

    One issue I have is that, for the most part, IMO, slavery in America is created by Americans. Democrats did not exist when indentured servitude and slavery were created here, slavery was later maintained by Southern Democrats, who transformed into DixieCrats, an quasi-third-party who pretty much imploded in 1948, ended by Republicans in the Civil War, resumed by Dixiecrats in form of the KKK, ended by Republicans with a myriad of civil rights bills, and then re-invented as racism in a systemic form by Northern City-crats. What are you smoking? It does not even pass a sniff test. Dixiecrats did not migrate to the North, quite the carpetbagger opposite, Northern Democrats represent a different breed altogether. So where did all those Northern Republicans, responsible for freeing the slaves wind up? Why did they lose leadership in most American cities? How did they become the party that supports racists and white supremacists?

    The Democrats that favored slavery, rationalized by blacks categorized as subhuman, and then forced to be sub human through depravity, became to be called Dixiecrats, a group mostly located in the south. There are few Northern Dixiecrats, then or now. Dixecrats pretty much imploded after the election of 1948 and while individuals and ideas lingered, a formal political power base was diminished, eroding completely within a generation. Many either became either Democrats favoring equal treatment under the law, Republicans, or something else. The third party run of the Dixiecrats was over.

    Horist then says that along the way, Republicans have saved the day with “De jure Jim Crow institutional racism in the South officially came to an end in the mid-1900s when the Republican sponsored and supported civil rights legislation of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 was successfully passed over the opposition and filibusters of the powerful Southern Democrats.” I will cross that Rubicon in another commentary but he is myopic in this opinion at best.

    Then he hits Jacksonville, a Florida city recently managed by a Democrat mayor, but governed by Republican mayors for 25 of the last 30 years. Thus, the hidden agenda is revealed as he seems to step up to defend DeSantistan, that conservative nirvana of the Southern Republican where racism has been so much better abolished over Northern Democratic cities according to Horist opinion. He’s gonna need a bigger boat to describe how this Republican managed city don’t have systemic racism. AHA —- the lone wolf with a mental health issue! By George, I think Horist gots it. Republican use of mental health is a balm that never goes bad. In a city that’s 60% white, 50% Republican that just flipped the mayor to Democrat, but only the Property Appraiser is Democrat, all other Constitutional Officers are Republican. The 19-member city council is over two thirds Republican.

    Nope, can’t be systemic racism by Democrats, we got to go with the Lone Wolf Scenario, even if the wolf is a registered Republican too. IMO, Horist needs to get outside of his paradigm, outside of the box thinking is needed: LONE WOLF. Or empowered, enraged, energized Republican? FYI: just about how many mass shooters are working as a team? Just saying, lone wolf low is pretty much oxymoronic low hanging fruit by definition. What about the environment in Jacksonville under Republican rule to end poverty, racism, and the American way :>). Any chance this is pretty similar to any Northern City? Next commentary I will look at what 25 out of the last 30 years of Republican rule has gotten Jacksonville in good ole DeSantistan.

    • larry Horist

      Frank Stetson … History is to be studied, not invented. You have soooooo many historic errors in your latest rant that I have to give you an “F” in History 101. While Democrats and Republicans came later, they cleaved on the slavery issue. Abolition was part of the colonial fabric. Franklin and the Adams boys were anti slavery, for example. The members of the Dixiecrats took a flyer in 1948 but they all returned to the Democratic Party afterward. Northern Democrat leaders were as racist as their southern counterparts. In trying to deny the institutional racism of the northern cities (run by Democrats) makes you abysmally ignorant or an effing liar You seem to forget that the staunch proponent of slavery was Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas. He was the Democrat candidate against Lincoln in 1860. I have neither the time nor interest in correcting your every ignorance.

  4. frank stetson

    For 25 out of the last 30 years, Jacksonville has been under Republican management who amazingly returned similar results to Northern Cities ruled by Democrats.

    Jacksonville is the 15th largest city in America, it’s pretty big. Recently, the voters tossed the Republicans as mayor for a Democrat. It was a big deal and a big loss for DeSantctimonious.

    Out of the top 100 cities, rates 52nd for violent crime, 37th for murder, 44th for rape, and 53rd for property crime. If you believe crime is up in America, Jacksonville is no shining city upon the hill, but instead firm in the muddle of the pack. With so many years of Republican control, one would think the law and order crowd could do better than their Northern comparatives.

    “Jacksonville, FL public schools have an average math proficiency score of 44% (versus the Florida public school average of 48%), and reading proficiency score of 44% (versus the 52% statewide average). Schools in Jacksonville have an average ranking of 4/10, which is in the bottom 50% of Florida public schools.” Not to say you can’t find a good school here, just to say that 25 years of Republican control has not been good for the schools. *https://www.publicschoolreview.com/florida/Jacksonville*

    Unemployment is good but has risen 30% since April to stand at 3% against the US avg of 3.5% and Florida’s 2.7%, good but not the shining light upon the hill type good for Florida.

    For housing, Jacksonville suffers as all of DeSantistan suffers due to mismanagement of housing supply versus population growth. IOW — Ronnie boy enticed them to come, but there’s nowhere to live, prices are skyrocketing against rising mortgage rates. But in Jacksonville, under Republican management, you can add: “The Department of Housing and Urban Development ranks Jacksonville’s public housing the lowest in Florida and among the worst 22 operations in the country,” a bit dated in 92, updated to 2005, but tells you Republicans still have work to do. *https://www.tampabay.com/archive/1992/07/22/jacksonville-s-public-housing-named-among-worst-in-u-s/*

    BOTTOM LINE: I can continue to extoll you on the plight of Jacksonville, under Republican rule, where systemic and overt racism exists like any American city, managed by any political party. The root cause is not party, but policies, which are somewhat equivalent from city to city and no one has completely broken the code to truly become the shining city upon the hill.

    Some is due to poverty, some to law. For example, school funding law says local funding and poverty does the rest. Even with “special laws” to provide additional funding to in-need districts, the scales are usually not balanced. While Republicans tout Charter Schools, in truth, neither party has cured this ill and governance under each party seems to reveal similar results.

    Even good infrastructure like new highways often creates a physical wall where poverty is on the inside and glory can be found outside the beltway. Good intentions with unintended outcomes.

    Yes, the worst cities for this are in the Northeast, and then the North. But the issue is not unique to these cities or cities under Democratic control.

    And Horist does not touch the 800 lb elephant on the table. If Republicans are such great managers, why don’t Northern Cities and all American cities vote for them? Why can’t they garner votes in urban areas if Democrats are doing such a piss poor job compared to them? They have piss poor results in this regard. Because the voter does not see the benefits of Republican management. Because it is not there. It’s an American problem that won’t be fixed by howling at the moon and blaming the other side.

    • Dan tyree

      What’s all the bullshit about who governs Jacksonville or all of the Jacksonville stats got to do with it fucking lunatic racist killing people? Now tell us all about Chicago and very blue cities In very blue states. You lefties make it up as you go. Are you saying that the governor of Florida caused this shit? Come on. Let’s see how stupid frank really is.

      • Frank stetson

        What did I make up?

        • larry Horist

          Frank Stetson … the entire history of slavery … which began on the continent in the mid 1500s in the Carolinas by the Spanish. Most Negroes brought to the Americas were NOT indentured servants. They were slaves. Two differences. Indentured servants volunteered in return for work and passage to the new world — even if it was a bad deal in the long run. They were not considered property. Black slaves were kidnapped and considered property with no hope of freedom. Their children were considered property much like the offspring of owned animals. Slavery existed in the colonies as a matter of practice until It was first legalized by Massachusetts in 1641.

          You strongly implied that Dixiecrats were not Democrats. It was just another informal name for southern Democrats. Just like moderate Democrats are called “Blue Dogs.”

          And you say I do not address why folks in those racist cities voter for Democrats — especially blacks. I have addressed that issue a number of times. Failing memory? Reading comprehension issue?

          Part of you disinformation is simply what you leave out A sin of omission. And finally, you enter in your usually litany of whataboutism and unrelated grievances. That is a refection of you obvious obsession.

          Damn .. you did it again. Hooked me into responding my making outrageously ignorant statements. LOL

      • larry Horist

        Dan tyree … Frank is trying desperately to prove he is a smart guy. That is why he so often praises his own “intellect”. Hs claims he sticks to the facts and then demonstrates no knowledge or loyalty to … the facts. In a few words, you crushed his long patchwork screed. You saw the fallacy instantly.

        • Frank stetson

          What did i make up mr horist?

    • larry Horist

      Frank Stetson … Are you are for the moron of the year award. What happened in Jacksonville was a lone wolf. That sort of racism can happen anywhere — and ai have so clearly stated. But you seem incapable of understanding the difference between the grassroots lone wolf issue and government imposed de facto institutional racism. Why is it that the most segregated cities in America — with the largest oppressed black populations — are all run by Democrats — and have been for generations? I guess that was just an accident.

  5. frank stetson

    “De jure Jim Crow institutional racism in the South officially came to an end in the mid-1900s when the Republican sponsored and supported civil rights legislation of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 was successfully passed over the opposition and filibusters of the powerful Southern Democrats.” What clever weasel wording sort making it look like it’s a Democratic filibuster, a Democratic opposition party. Or does Horist figure his audience is just so damned smart they will fill in the blanks. It is very clever, and seemingly complete spin for his politically biased narrative. His book will be better with less spin. It seems clear that Horist really knows his subject, the spin is purposeful to his political intents.

    I am proud of Democrats for meeting and ending the Dixiecrats, it’s a terrible time for our party. Horist can be proud of the 150 years of punishment being handed out to 5 insurrectionist magarat Republicans this week who are also white supremacists. Republicans have come a long way from Lincoln. And while he won’t vote for the cheerleader in his primary, he will vote for him if the nominee for his party.

    Dixiecrats, slavery, and racism are synonymous. And you did not have much choice in the antebellum South if you felt different. After the civil war, the clusterfuck of a Radical Republican destructive Reconstruction pretty much sealed the fate of where Southern Democratic feelings would lie. Military rule, universal suffrage, it was a punitive program that Southerners rejected. Were they more anti-Republican because of what the Republicans were doing to them, or because of race? Republicans certainly gave Southerners a reason to blame Blacks for their despair and disenfranchisement. No excuse for racism, but these folks had it bad under Radical Republican Civil War Reconstruction. Horist excludes that piece of Republican history.

    Dixiecrats represented a minority of US Democrats if for the very reason that the South had about 1/3rd the North’s population. They could influence but never win a national vote. But it was impossible to win a Southern election unless a Democrat — they made the Republican NRA’s political tactics look tame…

    In their only sanctioned Presidential election, 1948, the Dixiecrats, a quasi-third party, got a pitiful 39 electoral vote after the Dixiecrats walked out on the Democrats after Truman’s civil rights plank. And they never ran again.

    Several prominent conservative Democrats switched parties to become Republicans, including Strom Thurmond, Mills E. Godwin Jr. but most Dixiecrats returned to the Democratic fold until 1964/65 civil rights acts under LBJ where the Dixie Democrat flood gates into the Republican party opened. Not just because of race. Not at all, but the flood gates opened and as Johnson said: “we may never win in the South again” and many of the remaining Dixiecrats turned into Republicans after the 60’s civil rights passages. Not all, but many.

    Yes, Republicans supported and may have even sponsored early civil rights laws. But Democrats were there too, in numbers. We ran the show in Congress. Horist seems to spin his view there.

    The 1957 legislation was signed by Eisenhower after being passed in a Democratic Congress, both houses with Democratic support in both. It started as an Eisenhower proposal that AG Brownell proposed, both Republicans. Strom Thurmond led the opposition with the longest single person filibuster ever, it was a start for civil rights, but limited in advantaging Black voters after opposition amendments were added. LBJ was our majority leader and he tried the thread the needle between passage and a toothless bill. Without LBJ, this bill would not pass. In both the house and the senate, it passed in a bipartisan fashion. House: Republicans 167–19, Democrats 118–107. Senate: Republicans 43–0, Democrats 29–18. Amazingly, both dems in Texas and Tennessee voted for it. Later they invented the internet…. Folks really working the bill include Brownell, Republican, LBJ, and a Dem from NY – a Mr. Celler.

    The 1960 legislation put some teeth into the 1957 act, was signed by Eisenhower, was introduced by Celler, a Democrat, was passed 311-109 with 179 Democrats voting yea in a Democratic Congress, both houses.

    The 1964 act was proposed by Kennedy and represents landmark enhancements to the previous by highlight discrimination as a crime. There was a filibuster, this time by what remained of the Dixiecrats, about 18, for 72 days. Kennedy was assassinated, LBJ took over, an a bill, weakened like the 57 version, passed by Democrats in a Democratic Congress. Notably, the nea’s for both sides as a ratio became closer as Republicans started to look like Democrats in terms of civil rights.

    The 1964 version was the landmark of them all and put real teeth into everything previous. Mansfield (D) and Celler (D) were critical introducers of the bill with LBJ masterminding it through Congress. Democrats held a supermajority in Congress. In the House, the Republican nay ratio was higher than the Democrats —- the worm had turned, Johnson was right.

    Horist is correct on the facts, wrong in the spin IMO. His sentence should have read: De jure Jim Crow institutional racism in the South officially came to an end in the mid-1900s when the Republican’s first sponsored the first 1957 bill while supporting civil rights legislation of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 that was successfully passed over the opposition and filibusters of the powerful Southern Democrats while supported overall by Democrats and overwhelmingly by Republicans.

    • larry Horist

      Frank Stetson … I should add that your are right, the 1964 was necessitated to put the enforcement teeth into the legislation … the enforcement provision that was removed from the 1960 bill by Democrats, including Johnson and Kennedy. It was Johnson, not Kennedy, how was the hero of civil rights. The Kennedy presidency kept the Democratic Party in opposition to civil rights. It was Johnson, with the power of the presidency, who broke ranks and brought congressional Democrats to the table. It was an amazing political conversion — although somewhat steeped in Johnson’s renowned pragmatism..

  6. larry Horist

    Frank Stetson … You are wrong on both facts and spin. The Dixiecrats WERE Democrats — and the most powerful coalition within the Democratic Party. The Dixiecrats existed within the Democratic Party before 1948 — when they made an third party bid for President — and were back in the Democratic Party afterward. Y9u seem to think that the racist Democrats were only in the south. JFK was among the mor e notable northern members of Congress who voted with the southern Democrats. He voted against the 1957 Civil Rights Bill and vote to remove the enforcement provision of the 1960 Bill even as he was campaigning for President. He proposed civil rights legislation in his campaign, and when he became President, he had it assigned to a committee headed by a racist Dixiecrat who shelved it. He did nothing to promote civil rights during his days in office. Moe than three years without any civil rights bills from Democrats — even thought they had the presidency and both houses or Congress. When running for reelection in 1964, JFK again proposed civil rights legislation and had it sent to the same committed to be killed. It was the same trick all over again. It was Johnson who got behind civil rights and was able to get some
    Democrat support in congress. But it was the overwhelming support of Republicans and the leadership of GOP Senator Dirksen that got the Democrats filibuster ended and got the 1964 bill passed. It was Dirksen who co-drafted and introduced the 1965 Voting Rights Bill. And again passed by overwhelming Republican majorities. It is very likely that there would not have been a 1964 Civil Rights Act had Kennedy not been assassinated. How ironic is that? The credit goes exclusively to Johnson — and how that happened is an interesting story. Even after that Democrats mounted the Massive Resistance Movement against school integration. You seem to think that Democrat racism was confined to a few southern officials. Of course you completely discount the de facto institutional racism of the major Democrats controlled cities. Sorry, but if you look at the FACTS, institutional racism has been the MO of the Democratic Party since the days of Andrew Jackson. There will be a quiz.

    • Dan tyree

      Frank you spend too much time in the past. Racism is much less than other problems in our country. So stfu and quite trying to start a race war

  7. frank stetson

    Tell that to the Jacksonville Three murdered by the Republican racist as a hate crime of racism against Blacks although this angel was a Nazi so all the hate targets covered. Oh wait, there are dead, killed by overt racism by a Republican.

    Sorry dude, it may be less, it’s still out there and death is only part of the issue.

    Just because you see another bigger problem, does not mean we can’t address multiple problems at once time. I think mass murder is a HUGE problem, racists hate crimes resulting in killings seems to be in that ballpark as a priority at least. Might even get two birds with one stone quite often.

    • Dan tyree

      Frank I searched and found no mention of a political party that the Jacksonville shooter affiliated with. So give us some facts. Or does your stupidity believe that someone like him would automatically be a republican? I’ve been around both democrats and republicans for years. I don’t think you will believe me but I’ve heard more racist slurs and bad attitudes towards blacks from people who identify as democrats. Go figure. You people lie and spread misinformation and bullshit and expect us to believe that you people won’t steal elections.

  8. frank stetson

    Hard to respond Mr. Horist, there are so many words, so obsessive, how can I ever write this much to respond. Well, I’m your huckleberry.

    You seem in need of getting a life when you kick off with “Are you are for the moron of the year award” I sense you loosing not only your grip on the English language, but also what little grip on reality you may have left. In other words, get over it you crotchety old bitch, quit the stupid name calling and either discuss the issues or bugger off as the sanctimonious sack of senseless senile shit you are attempting to be, in your old age.

    I read your stuff, will try to cover all four here. I comment usually with a different vantage point, mostly back by legitimate evidence. Feel free to disagree (no problem), supported by evidence with decent sources (NFW). You say: “What happened in Jacksonville was a lone wolf. That sort of racism can happen anywhere — and ai have so clearly stated.” Was that you foot in your mouth or can you not speak without an editor? Someone younger no doubt. Because “and ai have so clearly stated” is just fucking funny. Clear as mud. No shit Sherlock and thank you Captain Oblivious for catching my “LONE WOLF. Or empowered, enraged, energized Republican” where I agree it’s a lone wolf but pose the question to garner your educated response by calling me the moron of the year. Who’s the moron now, fumble fingers? Maybe just stop with the demeaning comments. Especially if you can’t get the English correct.

    I then pointed out, with facts, something rare for you, that Jacksonville, a Southern City run traditionally by Republicans is a city where “I can continue to extoll you on the plight of Jacksonville, under Republican rule, where systemic and overt racism exists like any American city, managed by any political party. The root cause is not party, but policies, which are somewhat equivalent from city to city and no one has completely broken the code to truly become the shining city upon the hill” to wit you reply with more Horist shit like: you seem incapable of understanding blah de blah. Either stay on point or let’s both devolve into calling each other names. You keep extolling on your imagined fact that ONLY Democratic cities feature systemic racism, not Republican ones (which you say are too small to count), not towns, not states. I gave you Jacksonville, fairly large, large enough, Republican controlled for most of 30 years with systemic racism as well as overt racism like the Lone Wolf.

    But wait, there’s Horist: “You have soooooo many historic errors in your latest rant that I have to give you an “F” in History 101.” Sure shitting sounds like we are going to have a professorial rant versus a democratic discussion. Pick one error. One.
    Horist then leads off with “While Democrats and Republicans came later, they cleaved on the slavery issue.” Is that even English? And “cleaved,” even grandpa is not that oblique. Of course, dems and repubs came later, they had to come later than something. “Cleaved?” Some Northern Dems were abolitionists, some were even “free soil” advocates. Others were copperheads who basically just wanted the war to stop, to quit. There were even War Democrats who fully supported all war efforts and their rationale. Today that would be the Gung Ho side of the party. No way was all Northern Democrats synonymous with Dixiecrats the same way that all Republicans are not racists, although the preponderance of racists are Republican, or at least vote that way. Can’t you just help me understand before grading me a F which means you think I am a failure. And even though Horist knows failure in his personal, political world, I just can’t fathom why he feels he must spank me for every misstatement he dreams I made. Repressed memories perhaps?

    Horist also said abolition and slavery were part of the colonial fabric, so what? And, as I said — Dixiecrats attempted a national election, most returned to the fold after that adject failure, some left, and the real defections happened after the 64/65 civil rights enactments — thanks for adding nothing.

    “Northern Democrat leaders were as racist as their southern counterparts.” Prove that all Democratic leaders were as racist as the south. Prove it with something more than everyone knows or the cities prove it. Prove it is NOT TRUE that Republican cities feature systemic racism in a similar manner to Democratic cities too since that was the point proved by my Jacksonville evidence.

    “In trying to deny the institutional racism of the northern cities (run by Democrats) makes you abysmally ignorant or an effing liar” Abysmal ignorant fucking liar says it all. Did I ever deny northern cities featured systemic racism, you stupid sack of soapbox suds. Try “I can continue to extoll you on the plight of Jacksonville, under Republican rule, where systemic and overt racism exists like any American city, managed by any political party. The root cause is not party, but policies, which are somewhat equivalent from city to city and no one has completely broken the code to truly become the shining city upon the hill. Some is due to poverty, some to law. For example, school funding law says local funding and poverty does the rest. Even with “special laws” to provide additional funding to in-need districts, the scales are usually not balanced. While Republicans tout Charter Schools, in truth, neither party has cured this ill and governance under each party seems to reveal similar results. Even good infrastructure like new highways often creates a physical wall where poverty is on the inside and glory can be found outside the beltway. Good intentions with unintended outcomes. Yes, the worst cities for this are in the Northeast, and then the North. But the issue is not unique to these cities or cities under Democratic control.” Are you really that dumb to make your claim or did you just whip it out and wing it without even reading?

    “I have neither the time nor interest in correcting your every ignorance.” But you do have the time to tell me off, huh? I guess that’s easier on your brain, right? Just spew the venom, ez pz.

    And then the coup de grace “Frank Stetson … You are wrong on both facts and spin. The Dixiecrats WERE Democrats — and the most powerful coalition within the Democratic Party.” OK, smart guy, this sounds like the ole “all Republicans are not racists, but the vast majority of racists are Republican” story…… You are partly answering your own questions proving yourself wrong with your own words, not facts, of course. First, you admit the Dixiecrats were a Democratic coalition, not the Democratic party. And I will add quite the powerhouse given their massive Trump-like 3% win of the popular vote in 1948 and a whopping 39 electoral votes to only shrink away into the shadows unlike your vote should have, if indeed he becomes the nominee. I am not saying they did not exert power; I said they lobbied well, tenaciously, akin to how the Republican controlled NRA operates today. I can’t find actual membership numbers but the North is probably 3 times to 4 times more populus than the South, and I am sorry, there weren’t many Dixiecrats up here unless you can find them. The actual vote indicates how few there were, in numbers, on the record, even a dolt like you can find it.

    Your stuff on Kennedy is eye opening but not shocking. As to his reasons for voting there, not sure. But I am not a Kennedy fan to begin with so I don’t really know much. I have said in the past that without Kennedy’s assassination, we never would have made the moon. And IMO, the moon was a good thing. Now I can add the landmark 64/64 civil rights acts too. Thanks.
    “It was Johnson who got behind civil rights and was able to get some Democrat support in congress. But it was the overwhelming support of Republicans and the leadership of GOP Senator Dirksen that got the Democrats filibuster ended and got the 1964 bill passed. It was Dirksen who co-drafted and introduced the 1965 Voting Rights Bill.” Again, the bills would never pass without Democratic support even with OVERWHELMING Republican support. Yes, there were filibusters, yes, they stopped, so what. Point was they would not pass without Democratic support, a majority of Democrats, mostly Northern, supported, blowing the Dixiecrat vote out of the water. Yes, Republicans overwhelmingly voted yea but — as you know — the number of Republicans voting against civil rights increased with every bill from 1957 on. And you keep getting worse today.

    That’s that, Dixiecrats Southern, bad, but not all Democrats. Matter of fact, civil rights would not pass except for the Democratic majority and how they voted which concluded that Democrats, in toto, including Dixie, voted for the civil right bills and were instrumental in creating the 60’s, and better, more robust editions. Southern Democrats are a terrible history for us. I have no problem owning up to that. They are not the current party; most are Republicans or Democrats by now. Systemic racism exists across the land, it is not a single party’s purview, but a problem for all Americans. Yes, it’s worst in the cities, worse yet in Northeastern cities, but it’s everywhere and bad anywhere.

    So, for Republicans, Mr. Historian Horist, some questions: How did you get to banning black studies, adding the benefits of slavery to history lessons, crushing affirmative action and all those hundreds of state level voting restriction laws? (I know, it’s all my fault, I started it, I am to blame and I will tell you. I have a yuge tear building up in my good eye. It’s really big.)

    Chillax, and please let’s stop with the name calling. It’s just too easy to sink to the gutter, let’s be above that. Starting now. Again. One more time.

    • larry Horist

      Frank Stetson …. Looks like I hooked you right in your obsession to overreact. LOL I didn’t read it, just looked at the length. I doubt anyone else will read it.

  9. frank stetson

    DISMSSED by the guy who wrote more, but can only read less. Charter school no doubt.. I actually underreacted. It’s a matter of perspective. I write for myself, but let me give you the reader’s digest highlights.

    Hard to respond Mr. Horist, there are so many words, so obsessive, how can I ever write this much to respond. Well, I’m your huckleberry. You seem in need of getting a life. I sense you loosing not only your grip on the English language, but also what little grip on reality you may have left. In other words, get over it you crotchety old bitch, quit the stupid name calling and either discuss the issues or bugger off as the sanctimonious sack of senseless senile shit you are attempting to be, in your old age.

    Was that you foot in your mouth or can you not speak without an editor? Because “and ai have so clearly stated” is just fucking funny. Clear as mud. No shit Sherlock and thank you Captain Oblivious for catching my “LONE WOLF. Or empowered, enraged, energized Republican” where I agree it’s a lone wolf but pose the question to garner your educated response by calling me the moron of the year. Who’s the moron now, fumble fingers? Maybe just stop with the demeaning comments. Especially if you can’t get the English correct.

    I then pointed out, with facts, something rare for you, that Jacksonville,

    to wit you reply with more Horist shit like: you seem incapable of understanding blah de blah. Either stay on point or let’s both devolve into calling each other names.

    Pick one error. One.

    Horist then leads off with “While Democrats and Republicans came later, they cleaved on the slavery issue.” Is that even English? And “cleaved,” even grandpa is not that oblique. Of course, dems and repubs came later, they had to come later than something. Can’t you just help me understand before grading me a F which means you think I am a failure. And even though Horist knows failure in his personal, political world, I just can’t fathom why he feels he must spank me for every misstatement he dreams I made. Repressed memories perhaps? Prove it with something more than everyone knows or the cities prove it.

    trying to deny the institutional racism of the northern cities (run by Democrats) makes you abysmally ignorant or an effing liar” Abysmal ignorant fucking liar says it all. Did I ever deny northern cities featured systemic racism, you stupid sack of soapbox suds. Are you really that dumb to make your claim or did you just whip it out and wing it without even reading?

    “I have neither the time nor interest in correcting your every ignorance.” But you do have the time to tell me off, huh? I guess that’s easier on your brain, right? Just spew the venom, ez pz.

    OK, smart guy, this sounds like the ole “all Republicans are not racists, but the vast majority of racists are Republican” story…… You are partly answering your own questions proving yourself wrong with your own words, not facts, of course. The actual vote indicates how few there were, in numbers, on the record, even a dolt like you can find it.

    That’s that, Dixiecrats Southern, bad, but not all Democrats. Matter of fact, civil rights would not pass except for the Democratic majority and how they voted which concluded that Democrats, in toto, including Dixie, voted for the civil right bills and were instrumental in creating the 60’s, and better, more robust editions. Southern Democrats are a terrible history for us. I have no problem owning up to that. They are not the current party; most are Republicans or Democrats by now. Systemic racism exists across the land, it is not a single party’s purview, but a problem for all Americans. Yes, it’s worst in the cities, worse yet in Northeastern cities, but it’s everywhere and bad anywhere.

    So, for Republicans, Mr. Historian Horist, some questions: How did you get to banning black studies, adding the benefits of slavery to history lessons, crushing affirmative action and all those hundreds of state level voting restriction laws? (I know, it’s all my fault, I started it, I am to blame and I will tell you. I have a yuge tear building up in my good eye. It’s really big.)

    Chillax, and please let’s stop with the name calling. It’s just too easy to sink to the gutter, let’s be above that. Starting now. Again. One more time.