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High Ranking Clinton Foundation Leaders were Charged with Fraud

High Ranking Clinton Foundation Leaders were Charged with Fraud

Charity Navigator, a watchdog group that polices and rates charities based on their honesty and effectiveness won’t even rate the Clinton Foundation. It has too much of an “atypical business model,” they say, meaning that it doesn’t behave like an actual charity. For starters, most charities are run by honest people. Aside from the Clintons themselves, four of their board members have been charged if not convicted of serious financial crimes. Bribery and outright fraud top the list of crimes Clinton Foundation leadership has been charged with. 

Rather than hiring experienced and knowledgeable to lead their foundation, the Clintons chose their friends and big donors to be placed on the board. This is just one of the reasons Charity Navigator found them so dissimilar to other charities that they could not even establish a ranking. 
Vinod Gupt, a foundations trustee, was charged with fraud in 2008 after he apparently stole nearly $10 million from his company. He used the stolen money to travel on private jets, buy a yacht, pay for twenty different cars, and to pay his personal credit card bills. He eventually settled with the Securities and Exchange Commission for $4 million dollars, less than half of what he defrauded his company out of. He also misused company funds to pay Bill Clinton a $3 million consulting fee before getting his position at the Clinton Foundation, leading his shareholders to sue him. 
Sant Chatwal, another foundation trustee, has been convicted of illegal campaign financing and obstruction of justice, among other charges. 
Trustee Victor Dahdaleh was charged by Great Britain’s Serious Fraud Office with bribery after he gave over 35 million pounds to Bahrain executives in the hopes of securing a 2 billion pound contract. Dahdaleh would likely have been charged in another case, but a key witness plead guilty to conspiracy to fraud and then refused to testify, making it impossible to get any real evidence against Dahdaleh. The company he was working for at the time settled with the U.S. Justice Department for $384 million, but Dahdaleh was never charged as an individual. 
None of these people seem like the type who should be running a charity.  

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