A new Texas bill could bring down North Carolina-like reprisals
A new Texas bill could bring down North Carolina-like reprisals

On Thursday, Texas passed the Texas Privacy Act that requires the state's residents to use the bathroom that corresponds with the gender on their birth certificate. It also prohibits local governments from passing ordinances in opposition regarding intimate settings.

"Specifically, the bill states that a “private entity that leases or contracts to use a building owned or leased by" a public entity “is not subject to a policy developed under” the bill. In addition, the bill says that the state and various localities “may not require or prohibit a private entity that leases or contracts to use a building owned or leased by” a public entity “from adopting a policy on the designation or use of bathroom or changing facilities located in the building,” writes USA Today.

Texas, which is the most conservative of the states, should expect similar backlash like North Carolina did for its bathroom law. However, politicians have made it clear that they are not going to back down and that it’s for the protection of the Texan residents. 

"It's the right thing to do," said Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, a Houston Republican who quoted Martin Luther King Jr. in approval of the proposal. "The people of Texas elected us to stand up for common sense, common decency and public safety."

The bill sponsor argues that the legislation was not created to start a battle. It was introduced "not to start a controversy but to end one" said Sen. Lois Kolkhorst.

However, the news conference already had about a dozen protestors were loudly booing while carrying signs saying "Flush SB6" (Senate Bill 6.)

"Texas' largest business lobbying group says approving the measure and other popular anti-gay rights proposals could cost the state up to $8.5 billion and 100,000-plus jobs. Yet, many conservatives in the GOP-controlled Legislature, which convenes Tuesday, are expected to embrace the "bathroom bill." It could have problems clearing the state House, though, where Republican Speaker Joe Straus has suggested it won't be the highest priority," writes CNS News.

It's likely the state will see a similar pushback that North Carolina's bathroom law saw. The NCAA punished the state and decided to move the 7 championship games. Entertainers Bruce Springsteen, Ringo Starr, and Pearl Jam all canceled events there. PayPal even made a last minute decision to not open a 400-employee operation center in Charlotte like the company intended, following the bathroom bill. 

Even though North Carolina lost billions in revenue, Virginia and Kentucky has introduced similar bathroom protection bills and now Texas

"It's unnecessary, discriminatory and inconsistent with the constitutional value of equal protection for all," said Rebecca L. Robertson, ACLU's legal and policy director in a statement. "Make no mistake — the invidious intent of SB6 is to deny transgender Texans the ability to participate in public life."

This sounds like a declaration of war. But, liberals are not expected to be successful. 

"Texas already led a 13-state coalition that successfully sued to block an Obama administration order from last year requiring public schools nationwide to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice," writes CNS News.

Nevertheless, organizations and corporations may also punish Texas for the bill. NCAA, for example, may decide to not hold the Big 12 in the state.

“The Big 12 Conference is aware of the filing of Senate Bill 6 in the Texas State legislature," said Bob Burda, the league's associate commissioner for communications. "We will track the bill’s progress through the legislature, and at an appropriate time discuss its impact with our member institutions," writes USA Today. 

Author’s note: Only time will tell, but we doubt organizations will start to withdraw from Texas like they did from North Carolina because Texas will fight back.


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